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It is well established that there is no safe level of myopia and ocular disease including glaucoma, cataracts, choroidal neovascular membranes and retinal detachment present with myopia. The greater the amount of myopia, the higher the risk. [1].

Treatment options to prevent myopia progression include corneal reshaping/orthokeratology, pharmacological/atropine therapy, and soft multifocal contact lenses.

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Melissa Barnett OD, FAAO, FSLS
Dr. Melissa Barnett is a Principal Optometrist at the UC Davis Eye Center in Sacramento. She is an internationally recognized key opinion leader, specializing in anterior segment disease and specialty contact lenses. Dr. Barnett lectures and publishes extensively on topics including dry eye, anterior segment disease, contact lenses and creating a healthy balance between work and home life for women in optometry. She is a Fellow of the American Academy of Optometry, a Diplomate of the American Board of Certification in Medical Optometry (ABCMO) and serves on the Board of American Optometric Association (AOA) Cornea and Contact Lens Council, Women of Vision (WOV), Gas Permeable Lens Institute (GPLI), Ocular Surface Society of Optometry (OSSO) is Immediate Past President of The Scleral Lens Education Society (SLS). Dr. Barnett is a spokesperson for the California Optometric Association and a guest lecturer for the STAPLE program. She was awarded The Theia Award for Excellence for Mentoring by Women in Optometry (WO) in 2016.

1 COMMENT

  1. Great article! With utmost respect, I suggest that we don’t imply that myopia control will have effects on myopia-associated pathology. We can’t ignore the complex genetics involved. There is far more to myopia-associated glaucoma, cataract, and myopic retinal degeneration than our efforts to control axial length. A column on this will follow.